Wednesday, December 11, 2013

Building Bridges between Hydroculture and Permaculture


Urban Garden-Tomatoes, Peppers, Basil, and Broccoli by Nate. Photograph by Ed Grainger
There is a growing trend with using hydroponic technology combined with perma-culture cultivation techniques. Hydroponics is an advanced means of understanding and catering to plant biology. Give the plant access to everything it could ever need and the plant will do its existential duty and grow and produce to its fullest potential. Combine this with the perma-culturist premise to use existing natural systems to produce food; while at the same time replenishing the resources consumed during said production, and hydroponics quickly becomes a valuable means of producing  quick, plentiful, nutritious, sustainable, and environmentally conscious food production options. Aquaponics, a system of fish farming to produce nutrients for hydroponic crops has long been a viable option for creating a closed, sustainable, and renewable cultivation system (for some plants and fish); however, it does have limitations on the range of nutrients available for certain plants' biology; supplements do need to be used for flower and fruit bearing plants (either organic/or inorganic sources of phosphorous and potassium). When combining this strategy with a viable means of separating and reclaiming the supplemented nutrients from the hydro-culture waste by-product, and thus purifying the water used in the overall aquaponic and hydroponic systems (eg. bio-filters, solar distillers, reverse osmosis), you get a grass roots food production system that has minimal environmental foot prints. Hydroharbor.com is committed to bringing you the latest and greatest horticultural advancements available today; as well as, the knowledge needed to use them in an effective,  responsible and environmentally conscious way. Please feel free to visit HydroHarbor.com for more information on hydroponics growing tutorials; hydroponics news related articles; as well as, purchasing hydroponics supplies.

Sources:
Write up by The Wall Street Journal on trends in Aquaculture.
Hydroponics defined
Permaculture defined
Aquaponics defined
Urban Agriculture defined